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Brooklyn power trio Sanhedrin do metal the old school way, channeling the greats that preceded them to create something that is instantly familiar yet with a new, modern energy to it. With 2019’s The Poisoner they branched out, exploring new avenues and hitting home with every effort, all the while staying true to themselves. Now they return with Lights On, their most accomplished effort to date. “We want to satisfy ourselves with music that we are proud to present to the world. That’s the overall plan with every record we have made,” states vocalist/bassist Erica Stoltz. Adds drummer Nathan Honor, “hoping it would likely reach the widest audience of any of our work thus far, it was important that we further refined our sound and pulled out all the stops. These songs are a collection of feelings of loss, uncertainty, hope, fear, anger and a deep examination of the human condition. The music draws from our deep and varied influences and is presented in a fashion that is unabashedly Sanhedrin.”

Tracked, mixed and co-produced by Colin Marston at his studio Menegroth, The Thousand Caves in Woodhaven, Queens, New York, the band worked hard to capture their timeless, organic, live sound rather than something that sounded polished and contemporary, breathing extra life into the songs. “A record should capture the band’s essence and energy,” says Sosville. “There is a lot a band can do to enhance their sound with technology, but we try to avoid going down that slippery slope in favor of staying true to our live sound. That’s not to say we don’t use the tools available to enhance a moment here and there in the name of dynamics.” Their third record with Marston, the band have developed a strong rapport with the producer and the sessions were according to Stoltz “smooth as butter”, while Honor states “he’s such a talented musician himself that he’s able to immediately and effortlessly understand your intentions and help you be the best version of yourself.” SeventhBell Artwork handled the album cover, as they have the record’s two predecessors, having become an integral part of the Sanhedrin process, once again coming up with something unique that is fitting to the music. And when asked why anyone should give a damn about Sanhedrin in 2022 Honor answers the question most succinctly: “In a time where the world around you feels like it’s aflame, when our heavy metal heroes are beginning to disappear to failing health or changing social norms, we, Sanhedrin, stand here as a shining light through the dark. We are prepared to fly the flag of heavy metal in these trying and uncertain times, and have only begun to show the world what we are capable of.”